4 Reasons Why Every Kickstarter Project is Art

This post talks about the perhaps overlooked concept that every Kickstarter Project itself is a work of art. This work of art will be judged, perceived differently by different people, and be spoken of in any number of ways from high regard to low regard to not at all. In this post, I explore 4 parallels of a Kickstarter Project to an actual work of art.

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I can’t tell you all of the opinions people in general have about Kickstarter. I use Kickstarter as a tool, as many creators do, to present a new creative work to the masses and hopefully raise enough money to make it a reality. The creative works in my case are games. But, they can be anything. This post talks about the perhaps overlooked concept that every Kickstarter Project itself is a work of art. This work of art will be judged, perceived differently by different people, and be spoken of in any number of ways from high regard to low regard to not at all. In this post, I explore 4 parallels of a Kickstarter Project to an actual work of art.

brush-and-palette
Brush and Palette (Source: theoldmasterspaintings.com)

 

My art background dates back to when I was 8 years old. I showed an interest in drawing as many do at that age, but, my parents offered that I could take art lessons from a local artist living in my hometown, Barbara Capps. From my first lesson at age 8, I progressed through 14 years of formal training from Barbara in multiple mediums. As a game publisher and designer, I routinely draw on that background to both commission and approve works of art from other artists, to do a bit of layout work and graphic design, and to explore through game design different ways incorporate those years of lessons. I’m mentioning this background to simply note that I have had formal training in the creation of artwork, and I’ll pull from that a bit as I make parallels between art and any Kickstarter project page.

We’ll cover 4 parallels of art to kickstarter projects: Art ignites emotion, “Good” art is well thought out, Any piece of art has a limited time to make an impression, and Every piece of art invites judgment. Keep in mind we’re just talking about the presentation of the project- not the product itself.

Art ignites emotion

I think a good piece of art doesn’t just have a good composition or is just visually pleasing, which are both important, but, it also triggers an emotional response- whatever that emotion may be. In art, the emotion the artist is trying to trigger could be anything- sadness, love, empathy, excitement, peace, wonder, etc. The point is- that piece of art causes an emotional response.

Any Kickstarter project page (not the product, again, just how it is presented) should try and do the same thing, but, with a focused goal for that emotional response. For creators, you should come across with passion in your project videos or write-ups, otherwise, who will back you if you’re glum and un-interested in what you’re presenting? For backers, can you think of a project that just made you feel the excitement shared by the creator?

Buying, or backing in the case of Kickstarter pledges, is quite often an emotional response by the backer wanting to support the creator whose interests line up with their own. This can be for a game, a movie, a photographic collection, or any creative work that meets some need of the backer. And the need may simply be to support the creator and his or her passion for what they are doing.

Present that project with passion and you’ve got a much better chance of garnering support.

“Good” art is well thought out

I’m more of a realist with respect to art but I appreciate many forms of it. I’d say most works of art that I’d call “good in my opinion” are pretty well thought out. Think of the old masters. Did Michelangelo tackle the Sistine Chapel without a plan or a set of sketches? Probably not. And neither should a project creator.

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Inside the Sistine Chapel (Source: Public Domain)

 

Think hard about a well thought out project you’ve supported. How much of that motivation to click “Pledge” was because the page was well organized, covered every question you had before you thought of it, and generally seemed presented as if the creator had put a lot of time into the process?

Before I pledge, I expect creators to have taken their time to craft a well thought out plan, to cover the main points of crowdfunding anything- including why I should support it. It’s obvious when I view a project page whether or not it was rushed. Did the creator think everything through? Does the project make sense? Is it too good to be true? Does the creator have a plan for production and delivery?

Present these aspects well and you’ll grab my attention- because I know at that point you’ve done your homework as a creator.

Any piece of art has a limited time to make an impression

I’ve visited a lot of big name galleries- most recently The Met and The Guggenheim in NYC- and seen countless works of art by artists across many centuries in many different styles. But, I can honestly say I probably spent no more than 1 minute on each piece of art, if that. If you’ve ever walked around at any art gallery, think about how much time you spent looking at each work? Was it 1 minute? 5 minutes? Hours? Some of these artists spent years creating whatever you’re looking at for 1 minute. But, that’s the reality of how much time we give those works of art. In that limited time, did that work make an impression on you?

The same is true with any Kickstarter project. Someone who clicks a link to your project page has no idea how much time went into that presentation, that work of art, but, they know within 30 seconds if they are interested enough to read more or watch your video. The project image is likely the first thing they’ll see. Next, the pledge goal, amount pledged so far, and time remaining. Next, either they’ll watch the video and read more about the project or they’ll close their browser and move on. You have, like a piece of fine art in a gallery, 15-30 seconds to make an impression.

Every piece of art invites judgment

I participated in numerous art shows when I was younger. I’d enter a work in an event, sometimes paying a fee, show up at the event, and see the results of judgment by others. In general, all art is judged. At gallery events, prizes like Best in Show or 1st, 2nd, and 3rd places, sometimes corresponding with cash awards, are given by the judges based on their very subjective opinions. Artists have no problem competing for those prizes and presenting their works for judgment. With art, everyone has an opinion- and they’re all correct.

With Kickstarter, as a creator, you must understand that people will judge your project. Not just the product, but the project. Some will pick it apart- others will withhold a pledge because you may not have done it the way they wanted it done or maybe they thought your asking price was too high. Be prepared that others will judge your work of art, your project page, and they’ll most likely openly criticize anything they see fault in, hopefully in a constructive and non-toxic way. As a creator, listen to that judgment and learn from it, possibly even adjust what you’re doing while the project is active (if within reason to do so).

With Kickstarter, everyone has an opinion- and they’re all correct.

Final Thoughts

In conclusion, if you are a project creator, treat your page as a blank canvas upon which you’ll paint your story and why that story should receive support from hundreds or thousands of people you may have never met. Understand that you have 15-30 seconds to make an impression and ignite emotion in potential backers to learn more about what you’re doing. Think out everything. Spend a lot of time on this so that you aren’t constantly answering questions or adjusting things when the project is live. Understand that your project will be judged. The prize is not best in show- but- perhaps successful funding and whatever that may bring for you and your backers.

Author: cewargames

Game Designer and Publisher of tabletop board, card, and miniatures games in the Hobby Games market.

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