Polyversal is Funded!

Our latest game, Polyversal, hit its funding goal this week on Kickstarter. This post is just a short reflection on that to summarize why I think the second time around- we were successful.

I’m really excited that my latest game, Polyversal, is now funded on Kickstarter with a week to go!

58fe91e88da1bff0e4df4b872fb4ccfa_original

Polyversal has been a huge undertaking that designer Ken Whitehurst and I began working on together years ago. The premise is that it’s a universal miniatures system with an integrated design tool that lets you bring in any miniatures you want to use in the game. So any old miniatures from games of the past like Mechwarrior and others- get reborn in Polyversal. Kit-bashing, design, creativity… all encouraged.

And something else we’re doing that’s been really unique is creating boxed games of Polyversal for those new the miniatures scene- and to do so- we brought together 6 manufacturers. SIX. I have contracts with each of them to supply various aspects of the game- primarily miniatures. These companies are all small like mine and have been excellent to work with. The purpose of working with external companies instead of designing and casting miniatures on our own is fully described in my previous post The Concept of Polyversal.

24f6ce37e1248aeaeb3fb59a6832cd7c_original
Mercenary Battlegroup. One of five Battlegroups offered in the campaign made up of Miniatures from multiple partners.

Polyversal was a relaunched campaign. I cancelled the first campaign earlier this year and took a hard look at our strategy and presentation. I think some keys to being successful the second time around are:

If you’d like to check out Polyversal in its final week, head over to the project and let me know what you think!

Making a Kickstarter Project Video isn’t Easy…

In this post, I discuss some of the process I use and make a case with some current stats- to make those project videos very short. I also share some outtakes from making our latest Kickstarter video for Polyversal.

Kickstarter project videos are no easy task to create or edit.

I personally edit my own vids in Adobe’s Premiere Pro CS 5.5, which I find takes about 3-4 hours, sometimes more, to edit a single minute of good footage for a video. I make videos for everything- especially gameplay tutorials- some of which use Adobe’s After Effects to animate cards, dice, and so forth. This saves me time in the long run vs. explaining rules in forums and by e-mail. The rules already point to the videos which serve as examples.

For any video, it’s not easy on the front-end to capture good footage. For that, I personally use a Canon Vixia HF M30, which is a decent HD camcorder, and mount it on a tripod (please do that). There is definitely an art to video editing. As mentioned, I use Adobe’s products and I’m no pro at it by any means, but I have a general sense of what stuff to cut out. This post shares our latest Kickstarter Project Video, which is a follow-on blog to this previous post about improving length and content: Kickstarter Video Length and Content

The project video for Polyversal’s relaunch overall is 1:51 long. If features an intro by Ken and I and a flyover of the game in play while we continue to pitch the game. Even with that short of a video, current stats on our active kickstarter report that only 37% of over 1000 plays were actually completed! That’s not a terrible stat- but remember- 63% started to watch it and clicked away before the 1:51 was up. So remember, make it short. People generally do not have 2 minutes. Think about it- how many Kickstarter video plays have you completed?

Here is another reason to keep it short… Let’s say you spend 3-4 hours per final edited minute of film that ends up running 10 minutes overall… If 63% of people who click play stop watching less than 2 minutes into it– you’d have wasted about 48 hours of work editing film that no one is watching- because again, MOST people who click play will not finish watching the video. 2 minutes max.

“While fun to film, making a project video is never easy.”

So let’s have some fun. Here’s some of what was CUT out of my latest video. Join Ken and I (and yes, Benny in a cameo) in this collection of outtakes from our Project Video. We pre-planned the video, shot 30 minutes of film, and then I edited for about 12 hours to get less than 2 usable minutes! Watch our main video on the Kickstarter Page to see the final (good) edited version.

Here are the outtakes:

Screen Shot 2016-05-20 at 9.44.54 PM

Polyversal Relaunch – A critical look at the changes

Polyversal is back on Kickstarter for a relaunched campaign. Read this blog post for a critical look at what we did wrong in the initial campaign and how we addressed it for the relaunch.

photo-originalAfter a lot of hard work, I relaunched the Kickstarter project for Polyversal, a science fiction miniatures game I’m publishing from designer Ken Whitehurst. I’ve tried to implement my own advice and the advice of others for the relaunch, incorporating a ton of feedback from fans and other publishers. Jamey’s blog helped reshape the relaunch in particular, and I believe the second time around, Polyversal will be successful. After less than a week, we’re already in less than $9k away from funding a $30k goal, and we’re about to reveal the first stretch goal.

“I know we’ve got a great game, that’s not the issue- the issue boils down to how well we presented it.”

So why did Polyversal require cancellation when originally launched in January? I know we’ve got a great game, that’s not the issue- the issue boils down to how well we presented it. Here are some thoughts in hindsight that could have contributed to an unsuccessful initial campaign:

  • Issue 1: We needed a lower goal. $80k was the initial goal and was very kitchen-sink based. In other words, we put everything into the campaign we wanted to see for the game- that included a web-based design tool which is expensive to do, a set of terrain for which we were paying for the molds, and a production estimate of 1000 units minimum, which was too much to start.

  • Answer 1: We scaled back production estimates, broke the terrain out into its own Kickstarter, and for now, eliminated the web-based tool opting for templates instead which will accomplish the same thing. In addition, shipping is not included in the Kickstarter pledges, removing unpredictability, a buffer for that unpredictability, and allowing a lesser goal that would be the shipping portion of the campaign- which is ultimately a guess. This allowed the goal to be further reduced since it is all going to the product, not shipping and fulfilment. Notice the 4 shipping icons in the project image above.
  • Issue 2: The project video was too long. Even at 5 minutes, we included a story portion which was good and still useful, but, we never really pitched what the game is or does for players. It needed to be 2 minutes and include a pitch.

  • Answer 2: The project video was re-done completely, shortened to less than 2 minutes, and focused entirely on the pitch. The story video was embedded elsewhere in the page, but, the project video was not the place for it. Here’s a detailed blog post on the video changes.

  • Issue 3: The miniatures we presented in our boxed games are from 5 different manufacturers. We used their images to present those miniatures, which led to less cohesion in the overall presentation. Each company had their own photographic background and their own paint scheme for these miniatures, so, it looked like a hodgepodge.

  • Answer 3: Ken Whitehurst, the designer, painted all of the miniatures we needed in several distinct patterns for a much better presentation. I then photographed them very carefully to present them as “battlegroups” which better communicated their cohesion and purpose in the game. Here is an example of 1 of 4 battlegroup images:

    d29258485bdb437532ce2acc354a5cc0_original

  • Issue 4: The pledge levels were all over the place. Too many pledge levels were presented, they were unnecessarily confusing, adjusted after the project start, and provided too many options.

  • Answer 4: Less is more. Pledges in the new campaign were simplified to just a handful of the most important options for the game. Since shipping is handled externally from the pledges (post-KS invoicing for actual shipping costs), this allowed simple pledge options applicable to everyone regardless of location. Breaking out the terrain eliminated all of the terrain-based bundles.

  • Issue 5: We made a lot of adjustments and additions after the original campaign started. This is a problem because we should have had some of our embedded videos, explanations, and strategies for the game presented initially, not through updates mid-campaign. How many people were turned off at first glance due to too little information to never return for a second look after the information was added?

  • Answer 5: Gameplay videos, print-and-play demos, story elements, reviews, well-thought-out shipping strategies, all pledge options, and fully-explained game contents were all presented up front from day 1 in the new campaign. This ensures all of the information is there at the beginning, not added piecemeal throughout the campaign. It’s important. It’s all there. And it eliminates a lot of stressful work once the campaign is active- responding to questions, confusion, and adding content that should have been there to begin with.

I hope you’ll agree that our relaunch is much better than the cancelled original campaign. If you agree or disagree with any of these insights, please let me know!

 

4 Reasons Why Every Kickstarter Project is Art

This post talks about the perhaps overlooked concept that every Kickstarter Project itself is a work of art. This work of art will be judged, perceived differently by different people, and be spoken of in any number of ways from high regard to low regard to not at all. In this post, I explore 4 parallels of a Kickstarter Project to an actual work of art.

I can’t tell you all of the opinions people in general have about Kickstarter. I use Kickstarter as a tool, as many creators do, to present a new creative work to the masses and hopefully raise enough money to make it a reality. The creative works in my case are games. But, they can be anything. This post talks about the perhaps overlooked concept that every Kickstarter Project itself is a work of art. This work of art will be judged, perceived differently by different people, and be spoken of in any number of ways from high regard to low regard to not at all. In this post, I explore 4 parallels of a Kickstarter Project to an actual work of art.

brush-and-palette
Brush and Palette (Source: theoldmasterspaintings.com)

 

My art background dates back to when I was 8 years old. I showed an interest in drawing as many do at that age, but, my parents offered that I could take art lessons from a local artist living in my hometown, Barbara Capps. From my first lesson at age 8, I progressed through 14 years of formal training from Barbara in multiple mediums. As a game publisher and designer, I routinely draw on that background to both commission and approve works of art from other artists, to do a bit of layout work and graphic design, and to explore through game design different ways incorporate those years of lessons. I’m mentioning this background to simply note that I have had formal training in the creation of artwork, and I’ll pull from that a bit as I make parallels between art and any Kickstarter project page.

We’ll cover 4 parallels of art to kickstarter projects: Art ignites emotion, “Good” art is well thought out, Any piece of art has a limited time to make an impression, and Every piece of art invites judgment. Keep in mind we’re just talking about the presentation of the project- not the product itself.

Art ignites emotion

I think a good piece of art doesn’t just have a good composition or is just visually pleasing, which are both important, but, it also triggers an emotional response- whatever that emotion may be. In art, the emotion the artist is trying to trigger could be anything- sadness, love, empathy, excitement, peace, wonder, etc. The point is- that piece of art causes an emotional response.

Any Kickstarter project page (not the product, again, just how it is presented) should try and do the same thing, but, with a focused goal for that emotional response. For creators, you should come across with passion in your project videos or write-ups, otherwise, who will back you if you’re glum and un-interested in what you’re presenting? For backers, can you think of a project that just made you feel the excitement shared by the creator?

Buying, or backing in the case of Kickstarter pledges, is quite often an emotional response by the backer wanting to support the creator whose interests line up with their own. This can be for a game, a movie, a photographic collection, or any creative work that meets some need of the backer. And the need may simply be to support the creator and his or her passion for what they are doing.

Present that project with passion and you’ve got a much better chance of garnering support.

“Good” art is well thought out

I’m more of a realist with respect to art but I appreciate many forms of it. I’d say most works of art that I’d call “good in my opinion” are pretty well thought out. Think of the old masters. Did Michelangelo tackle the Sistine Chapel without a plan or a set of sketches? Probably not. And neither should a project creator.

2697740_eb582ccca0_b
Inside the Sistine Chapel (Source: Public Domain)

 

Think hard about a well thought out project you’ve supported. How much of that motivation to click “Pledge” was because the page was well organized, covered every question you had before you thought of it, and generally seemed presented as if the creator had put a lot of time into the process?

Before I pledge, I expect creators to have taken their time to craft a well thought out plan, to cover the main points of crowdfunding anything- including why I should support it. It’s obvious when I view a project page whether or not it was rushed. Did the creator think everything through? Does the project make sense? Is it too good to be true? Does the creator have a plan for production and delivery?

Present these aspects well and you’ll grab my attention- because I know at that point you’ve done your homework as a creator.

Any piece of art has a limited time to make an impression

I’ve visited a lot of big name galleries- most recently The Met and The Guggenheim in NYC- and seen countless works of art by artists across many centuries in many different styles. But, I can honestly say I probably spent no more than 1 minute on each piece of art, if that. If you’ve ever walked around at any art gallery, think about how much time you spent looking at each work? Was it 1 minute? 5 minutes? Hours? Some of these artists spent years creating whatever you’re looking at for 1 minute. But, that’s the reality of how much time we give those works of art. In that limited time, did that work make an impression on you?

The same is true with any Kickstarter project. Someone who clicks a link to your project page has no idea how much time went into that presentation, that work of art, but, they know within 30 seconds if they are interested enough to read more or watch your video. The project image is likely the first thing they’ll see. Next, the pledge goal, amount pledged so far, and time remaining. Next, either they’ll watch the video and read more about the project or they’ll close their browser and move on. You have, like a piece of fine art in a gallery, 15-30 seconds to make an impression.

Every piece of art invites judgment

I participated in numerous art shows when I was younger. I’d enter a work in an event, sometimes paying a fee, show up at the event, and see the results of judgment by others. In general, all art is judged. At gallery events, prizes like Best in Show or 1st, 2nd, and 3rd places, sometimes corresponding with cash awards, are given by the judges based on their very subjective opinions. Artists have no problem competing for those prizes and presenting their works for judgment. With art, everyone has an opinion- and they’re all correct.

With Kickstarter, as a creator, you must understand that people will judge your project. Not just the product, but the project. Some will pick it apart- others will withhold a pledge because you may not have done it the way they wanted it done or maybe they thought your asking price was too high. Be prepared that others will judge your work of art, your project page, and they’ll most likely openly criticize anything they see fault in, hopefully in a constructive and non-toxic way. As a creator, listen to that judgment and learn from it, possibly even adjust what you’re doing while the project is active (if within reason to do so).

With Kickstarter, everyone has an opinion- and they’re all correct.

Final Thoughts

In conclusion, if you are a project creator, treat your page as a blank canvas upon which you’ll paint your story and why that story should receive support from hundreds or thousands of people you may have never met. Understand that you have 15-30 seconds to make an impression and ignite emotion in potential backers to learn more about what you’re doing. Think out everything. Spend a lot of time on this so that you aren’t constantly answering questions or adjusting things when the project is live. Understand that your project will be judged. The prize is not best in show- but- perhaps successful funding and whatever that may bring for you and your backers.